Hacker from the 2016 Bitfinex Breach ... - news.bitcoin.com

Subreddit Stats: programming top posts from 2019-10-22 to 2020-10-21 06:41 PDT

Period: 364.67 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 180545
Rate (per day) 2.74 491.84
Unique Redditors 629 34951
Combined Score 1178903 2688497

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 47468 points, 49 submissions: iamkeyur
    1. One Guy Ruined Hacktoberfest 2020 (3039 points, 584 comments)
    2. AWS forked my project and launched it as its own service (2956 points, 810 comments)
    3. Privacy analysis of Tiktok’s app and website (2858 points, 234 comments)
    4. 98.css – design system for building faithful recreations of Windows 98 UIs (2781 points, 318 comments)
    5. Microsoft demos language model that writes code based on signature and comment (2621 points, 614 comments)
    6. Why does HTML think “chucknorris” is a color? (2565 points, 531 comments)
    7. Windows 95 UI Design (2309 points, 665 comments)
    8. The Linux codebase has over 3k TODO comments, many from over a decade ago (2119 points, 369 comments)
    9. eBay is port scanning visitors to their website (1829 points, 236 comments)
    10. Using const/let instead of var can make JavaScript code run 10× slower in Webkit (1814 points, 525 comments)
  2. 44853 points, 28 submissions: speckz
    1. From August, Chrome will start blocking ads that consume 4MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage in any 30 second period, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage (8434 points, 590 comments)
    2. How To Spot Toxic Software Jobs From Their Descriptions (6246 points, 1281 comments)
    3. A Facebook crawler was making 7M requests per day to my stupid website (2662 points, 426 comments)
    4. Apple, Your Developer Documentation is Garbage (2128 points, 432 comments)
    5. The code I’m still ashamed of (2016) (2105 points, 429 comments)
    6. Slack Is Fumbling Developers And The Rise Of Developer Discords (2095 points, 811 comments)
    7. The Chromium project finds that around 70% of our serious security bugs are memory safety problems. Our next major project is to prevent such bugs at source. (1959 points, 418 comments)
    8. Advice to Myself When Starting Out as a Software Developer (1934 points, 257 comments)
    9. Software patents are another kind of disease (1893 points, 419 comments)
    10. My favourite Git commit (1772 points, 206 comments)
  3. 35237 points, 28 submissions: whackri
    1. It is perfectly OK to only code at work, you can have a life too (6765 points, 756 comments)
    2. Kernighan's Law - Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it. (5171 points, 437 comments)
    3. The entire Apollo 11 computer code that helped get us to the Moon is available on github. (3841 points, 433 comments)
    4. Raytracing - in Excel! (2478 points, 168 comments)
    5. Writing userspace USB drivers for abandoned devices (1689 points, 84 comments)
    6. Drum Machine in Excel (1609 points, 60 comments)
    7. fork() can fail: this is important (1591 points, 264 comments)
    8. Learn how computers add numbers and build a 4 bit adder circuit (1548 points, 66 comments)
    9. Heroes Of Might And Magic III engine written from scratch (open source, playable) (1453 points, 84 comments)
    10. Apollo Guidance Computer: Restoring the computer that put man on the Moon (1277 points, 47 comments)
  4. 14588 points, 11 submissions: pimterry
    1. I'm a software engineer going blind, how should I prepare? (4237 points, 351 comments)
    2. The 2038 problem is already affecting some systems (1988 points, 518 comments)
    3. TLDR pages: Simplified, community-driven man pages (1897 points, 182 comments)
    4. JetBrains Mono: A Typeface for Developers (1728 points, 456 comments)
    5. BlurHash: extremely compact representations of image placeholders (930 points, 159 comments)
    6. Let's Destroy C (855 points, 290 comments)
    7. Shared Cache is Going Away (833 points, 192 comments)
    8. XML is almost always misused (766 points, 538 comments)
    9. Wireshark has a new packet diagram view (688 points, 24 comments)
    10. fork() can fail: this is important (460 points, 299 comments)
  5. 14578 points, 9 submissions: magenta_placenta
    1. Trello handed over user's personal account to user's previous company (2962 points, 489 comments)
    2. Feds: IBM did discriminate against older workers in making layoffs - “Analysis shows it was primarily older workers (85.85%) in the total potential pool of those considered for layoff,” the EEOC wrote (2809 points, 509 comments)
    3. Stripe Workers Who Relocate Get $20,000 Bonus and a Pay Cut - Stripe Inc. plans to make a one-time payment of $20,000 to employees who opt to move out of San Francisco, New York or Seattle, but also cut their base salary by as much as 10% (2765 points, 989 comments)
    4. US court fully legalized website scraping and technically prohibited it - On September 9, the U.S. 9th circuit court of Appeals ruled that web scraping public sites does not violate the CFAA (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) (2014 points, 327 comments)
    5. I Suspect many Task Deadlines are Designed to Force Engineers to Work for Free (1999 points, 553 comments)
    6. Intent to Deprecate and Freeze: The User-Agent string (1012 points, 271 comments)
    7. Contractor admits planting logic bombs in his software to ensure he’d get new work (399 points, 182 comments)
    8. AlphaStar: Grandmaster level in StarCraft II using multi-agent reinforcement learning (396 points, 97 comments)
    9. Half of the websites using WebAssembly use it for malicious purposes - WebAssembly not that popular: Only 1,639 sites of the Top 1 Million use WebAssembly (222 points, 133 comments)
  6. 13750 points, 3 submissions: pedrovhb
    1. Bubble sort visualization (7218 points, 276 comments)
    2. Breadth-first search visualization (3874 points, 96 comments)
    3. Selection sort visualization (2658 points, 80 comments)
  7. 11833 points, 1 submission: flaming_bird
    1. 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code (11833 points, 956 comments)
  8. 11208 points, 10 submissions: PowerOfLove1985
    1. No cookie consent walls — and no, scrolling isn’t consent, says EU data protection body (5975 points, 890 comments)
    2. Redesigning uBlock Origin (1184 points, 162 comments)
    3. Playing Around With The Fuchsia Operating System (696 points, 164 comments)
    4. Microsoft's underwater data centre resurfaces after two years (623 points, 199 comments)
    5. Microsoft Paint/Paintbrush in Javascript (490 points, 58 comments)
    6. GitHub shuts off access to Aurelia repository, citing trade sanctions (478 points, 81 comments)
    7. How 3D Game Rendering Works: Texturing (475 points, 22 comments)
    8. Simdjson: Parsing Gigabytes of JSON per Second (441 points, 90 comments)
    9. How 1500 bytes became the MTU of the internet (435 points, 60 comments)
    10. It’s OK for your open source library to be a bit shitty (411 points, 130 comments)
  9. 10635 points, 8 submissions: michalg82
    1. Turning animations to 60fps using AI (3449 points, 234 comments)
    2. Bug #1463112 “Cat sitting on keyboard crashes lightdm” (3150 points, 143 comments)
    3. Heroes Of Might And Magic III engine written from scratch (open source, playable) (1431 points, 172 comments)
    4. Vulkan is coming to Raspberry Pi: first triangle - Raspberry Pi (1318 points, 66 comments)
    5. An EPYC trip to Rome: AMD is Cloudflare's 10th-generation Edge server CPU (431 points, 60 comments)
    6. Microsoft cancels GDC 2020 presence due to coronavirus concerns (Following Sony, Facebook, Kojima Productions, Epic Games, Unity, and more) (371 points, 52 comments)
    7. Moving from reCAPTCHA to hCaptcha - The Cloudflare Blog (278 points, 71 comments)
    8. How much of a genius-level move was using binary space partitioning in Doom? (207 points, 109 comments)
  10. 10106 points, 10 submissions: SerenityOS
    1. Someone suggested I should host my website on my own OS. For that we'll need a web server, so here's me building a basic web server in C++ for SerenityOS! (2269 points, 149 comments)
    2. I've been learning about OS security lately. Here's me making a local root exploit for SerenityOS, and then fixing the kernel bugs that made it possible! (1372 points, 87 comments)
    3. SerenityOS was hacked in a 36c3 CTF! (Exploit and write-up) (1236 points, 40 comments)
    4. One week ago, I started building a JavaScript engine for SerenityOS. Here’s me integrating it with the web browser and adding some simple API’s like alert()! (1169 points, 63 comments)
    5. Implementing macOS-style "purgeable memory" in my kernel. This technique is amazing and helps apps be better memory usage citizens! (1131 points, 113 comments)
    6. SerenityOS: The second year (900 points, 101 comments)
    7. Using my own C++ IDE to make a little program for decorating my webcam frame (571 points, 33 comments)
    8. This morning I ported git to SerenityOS. It took about an hour and some hacks, but it works! :D (547 points, 64 comments)
    9. Smarter C/C++ inlining with attribute((flatten)) (521 points, 118 comments)
    10. Introduction to SerenityOS GUI programming (390 points, 45 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. XANi_ (10753 points, 821 comments)
  2. dnew (7513 points, 641 comments)
  3. drysart (7479 points, 202 comments)
  4. MuonManLaserJab (6666 points, 233 comments)
  5. SanityInAnarchy (6331 points, 350 comments)
  6. AngularBeginner (6215 points, 59 comments)
  7. SerenityOS (5627 points, 128 comments)
  8. chucker23n (5465 points, 370 comments)
  9. IshKebab (4898 points, 393 comments)
  10. L3tum (4857 points, 199 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code by flaming_bird (11833 points, 956 comments)
  2. hentAI: Detecting and removing censors with Deep Learning and Image Segmentation by 7cmStrangler (9621 points, 395 comments)
  3. US Politicians Want to Ban End-to-End Encryption by CarrotRobber (9427 points, 523 comments)
  4. From August, Chrome will start blocking ads that consume 4MB of network data, 15 seconds of CPU usage in any 30 second period, or 60 seconds of total CPU usage by speckz (8434 points, 590 comments)
  5. Mozilla: The Greatest Tech Company Left Behind by matthewpmacdonald (7566 points, 1087 comments)
  6. Bubble sort visualization by pedrovhb (7218 points, 276 comments)
  7. During lockdown my wife has been suffering mentally from pressure to stay at her desk 100% of the time otherwise after a few minutes her laptop locks and she is recorded as inactive. I wrote this small app to help her escape her desk by periodically moving the cursor. Hopefully it can help others. by silitbang6000 (7193 points, 855 comments)
  8. It is perfectly OK to only code at work, you can have a life too by whackri (6765 points, 756 comments)
  9. Blockchain, the amazing solution for almost nothing by imogenchampagne (6725 points, 1561 comments)
  10. Blockchain, the amazing solution for almost nothing by jessefrederik (6524 points, 1572 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 2975 points: deleted's comment in hentAI: Detecting and removing censors with Deep Learning and Image Segmentation
  2. 2772 points: I_DONT_LIE_MUCH's comment in 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code
  3. 2485 points: api's comment in Stripe Workers Who Relocate Get $20,000 Bonus and a Pay Cut - Stripe Inc. plans to make a one-time payment of $20,000 to employees who opt to move out of San Francisco, New York or Seattle, but also cut their base salary by as much as 10%
  4. 2484 points: a_false_vacuum's comment in Stack Overflow lays off 15%
  5. 2464 points: iloveparagon's comment in Google engineer breaks down the problems he uses when doing technical interviews. Lots of advice on algorithms and programming.
  6. 2384 points: why_not_both_bot's comment in During lockdown my wife has been suffering mentally from pressure to stay at her desk 100% of the time otherwise after a few minutes her laptop locks and she is recorded as inactive. I wrote this small app to help her escape her desk by periodically moving the cursor. Hopefully it can help others.
  7. 2293 points: ThatInternetGuy's comment in Iranian Maintainer refuses to merge code from Israeli Developer. Cites Iranian regulations.
  8. 2268 points: xequae's comment in I'm a software engineer going blind, how should I prepare?
  9. 2228 points: turniphat's comment in AWS forked my project and launched it as its own service
  10. 2149 points: Rami-Slicer's comment in 20GB leak of Intel data: whole Git repositories, dev tools, backdoor mentions in source code
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
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Open thread, August 2017

This is an open thread to discuss items of interest. I may also use it to drop thoughts as they occur to me as well -- something of a replacement of my former "tab closure" posts, as ... well, it seems tabs are simply running away from me. Consider this an experiment that's been mulling for some time.
If you've got a question, observation, link, or anything else, feel free to post it, with a thought to the lair rules -- like house rules, but larrier.
An evolving conversation....

Kafka as Epistemist

From "The Kafkaesque Process of Cancer Diagnosis", the concept applied here to cancer diagnosis, and in Kafka's The Trial to a process of judgement, strikes me as profoundly epistemological:
The patient continued, “You understand that the many tests and the elusive information of the recent weeks remind me of Franz Kafka's words in his famous work Der Prozess, meaning both trial and process.” “The verdict does not come suddenly, proceedings continue until a verdict is reached gradually.”

I am looking for tools to make sense of HTML DOMs

Probably in Python, though other general scripting, or possibly, compiled languages, might work. Javascript is another possibility, with a few extant tools employing this.
The primary goal is to extract document metadata (title, author, publisher, date, URL), and include the body of a document whilst excluding, or at the very least marking as secondary the ancillary bits. The though occurs that frequency / similarity analysis of the constant bits might help.
The extant tools of Readability's parser (it's survived the fall of the service), Pocket, Instapaper, Outline, etc., may be useful.
Inquiries elsewhere have also brought up Pilgrim, a project of the Knight Foundation (as Outline may also be), which isn't exactly what I'm looking for, but it's interesting in its own right.

On nuclear power and safety

There's an article making the rounds, poorly argued, IMO, extolling nuclear energy. I've been heartened by the critical response it's triggered at Hacker News, including my own contribution, previously submitted at G+ on Joerg Fliege's thread, drawing comparisons to the Banqiao Dam disaster of 1975. In part:
Proponents of nuclear power assume that we can assess risks with tails not of the decade or so of Banqiao, but of 100, 1,000, 1 million years. Utterly outside the scope of any human institutions, or of the human species itself.
Our models of risks and of costs fail us....
The problems with nuclear power are massive, long-tailed, systemic and potentially existential. The same cannot be said of a wind farm or solar array. There is no significant 10,000 year threat from wind power, or solar power. We're not risking 30 - 60 km exclusion zones, on an unplanned basis, of which we've created at least four in the half-decade of significant nuclear energy applications: Hanford, Washington, Three Mile Island, Pennsyvania, Chernobyl, Ukraine, and Fukushima, Japan. And this is with a global plant of some 450 operating nuclear power plants as of 2017....
If the total experience has been, say, 500 reactors, over 50 years, or 25,000 reactor-years of experience, and we've experienced at least four major disasters, then our failure rate is 0.016%.
The global share of nuclear power generation in 2012 was about 10%.[4] Which means that without allowing for increased electrical consumption within existing or extending to developing nations, the plant count would have to increase tenfold.
Holding the reactor-year failure rate constant would mean 80 core meltdowns per century. Reducing that to the present rate of four meltdowns/century would require reducing the failure rate to 0.0008%. That's five nines, if anyone's counting.
Five nines on a process involving weather, politics, business, social upheaval, terrorism, sabotage, individual psychology, group psychology, climate, communications, response, preparedness....

"8 Lessons from 20 years of Hype Cycles"

A look at the Gartner Hype Cycle, and lessons derived therefrom:
  1. We're terrible at making predictions. Especially about the future.
  2. An alarming number of technology trends are flashes in the pan.
  3. Lots of technologies just die. Period.
  4. The technical insight is often correct, but the implementation isn't there
  5. We've been working on a few core technical problems for decades
  6. Some technologies keep receding into the future
  7. Lots of technologies make progress when no-one is looking
  8. Many major technologies flew under the Hype Cycle radar
Michael Mullany, "8 Lessons from 20 Years of Hype Cycles".

David Gerard at the Financial Times on Bitcoin and Blockchain

David Gerard, author of Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain, interviewed by Izabella Kaminska about Bitcoin, /Buttcoin, and Tulips, among other topics. There's a bunch of great information in this podcast, of which I'll highlight two items in particular.
I've been reflecting a great deal on information, truth, and that boundary between information and belief, most principally trust. Gerard nails the value proposition of trust, and a problem with the Free All the Things trope of decentralisation:
Decentralisation is the paramount feature in bitcoin, but it turns out that that's a bad idea that's really, really expensive, because it turns out that a tiny bit of trust saves you a fortune.
"Decentralised" isn't a useful buzzword in a lot of ways, because it turns out that you want to be a part of society.
He also points at the invalidity of market capitalisation as a concept. It's an arithmetically inexpensive value to obtain (multiply total quantity by present price), but, especially in the thin markets typical of Bitcoin, it is essentially a fantasy value with no real meaning. From a conversation at The Other Place:
[C]rypto "market cap" is a meaningless number. Even on Bitcoin, the most popular one, about 100 BTC will clear the order book on any exchange. Crypto "market cap" is not a number you could realise, it's not how much money went into it, it's not anything useful. If you want to compare cryptos by interest, you'd need to measure daily trading volumes, which is a harder number to gather, and market cap doesn't turn out to be a good proxy for it. So billions of dollars in free money weren't actually just created - instead it's millions of tokens that may or may not be tradeable for ordinary bitcoins or for cash, if you don't go very fast at all.
This evokes my own explorations of cost, price, and value, and what exactly they mean.
One analogy that Gerard, Alex Kudlick, and I are leaning toward is that of electric circuits. Price is analogous to pressure, or potential (voltage). Volume would be current. This raises the question of what resistance, capacitance, and impedance would have as analogues....
FT: Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain with David Gerard (Soundcloud: 65 minutes). Highly recommended.
And you'll find Gerard on Reddit as dgerard.

Yonatan Zunger on the evolution of U.S. "court costs"

In "The history of “court costs”", Zunger writes of "a system that [you might think] has gone out of control, a mechanism that started with a good purpose that got eaten by corruption and incompetence. But you would be wrong."
In the post-Civil War South, a system came up when plantations, factories, or mines needed workers. It was based on that clever little exception in the 13th Amendment:
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Note that it doesn’t say what kind of crime you have to be convicted of.
The short of it: slavery is not illegal in the United States, just somewhat regulated.
My own main commentary ... probably worth posting in its own right, is that whilst Zunger raises excellent points about the intentionality of this system and its antecedents to Nazi Germany's concentration camps, the fact is that none of these phenomena are particularly American, nor particularly new. This isn't to excuse the United States of its guilt.
Rather: these behaviours, systems, and dynamics seem to be deeply rooted. Whether they're merely cultural (the examples I've given are all from cultural antecedants or siblings to US tradition), part of human behavioral psychology, or deeper even than that, this is not simply a matter of bad laws and bad people. Rather: It is a case of such rules and dynamics actively succeeding and crowding out alternatives.
There are two good discussions at The Other Place from the original Tootstorm and from the Medium essay.

When your political opponents are made of money ...

In politics, a growing problem is the dominance of interests who apparently have nothing but money to throw at problems
Utilising this fact in judo fashion, the thought occurs that that one possible response is to create a vast wall of problems for which they find it necessary to throw money at.
The less ease with which to discern between actual problems and fantasmic simaculra of problems, so much the better.
Have fun storming the castle!

Bill Browder: "It turned out that in Putin's Russia, there are no good guys."

At NPR: "Businessman Paints Terrifying And Complex Picture Of Putin's Russia:
In what one senator called one of the Senate Judiciary Committee's "most important" hearings, [William] Browder, a wealthy businessman-turned-activist-turned Putin-adversary shed a chilling new light on a Russian system of government that operates ruthlessly in the shadows — as Browder described it for lawmakers: a "kleptocracy" sustained by corruption, blackmail, torture and murder with Putin at its center.
"Effectively the moment that you enter into their world," Browder told senators investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, "you become theirs."
Oh, and "Russian adoptions" are one of the dog whistles for the Magnitsky Act, legislation passed in the U.S. in 2012, named after Browder's now-murdered Russian lawyer, Sergei Magnitski, imposing sanctions on human-rights violators.
Also the topic of a certain July, 2016 meeting featuring Donald Trump, Jr., and senior members of the Trump campaign, of recent memory.

The distinction isn't "online vs. offline" but "direct vs. mediated"

Articles and books on the impacts of digital and mobile media are a dime a dozen, and may be as laughable, or prophetic, as previous gerimiads on new media. "Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation" is fairly typical of the genre, if better than most.
Reading it, a thought recurs to me: the distinction isn't of online vs. offline, but or even screen time, but of mediated vs. direct experience.
Media mediates. It is literally that which is between the observer and the observed. And with increasingly smart media, those exchanges are very directly mediated, interposed, by third (and fourth, and fifth, and ...) parties.
This has multiple effects, a few:
I'd argue there are degrees of mediation as well. Analogue devices such as the telephone are less mediated than digital feeds such as Facebook or YouTube.
And this isn't the first period to have such experiences. I have frequent cause to point out that intellectual, academic, and creative experiences were very often epistolary, exchanges of letters. Though generally with less rapidity than today's 'round-the-world-in-a-second emails.
But that whole "online" and "cyberspace" distinction? Lose it.

The etymology of "data" ... peculiarly uninformative

I'm rather the fan of looking at etymologies of words. They often reveal interesting origins, connections, or evolutions. The etymology of data would be a peculiar exception:
1640s, classical plural of datum, from Latin datum "(thing) given," neuter past participle of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Meaning "transmittable and storable computer information" first recorded 1946. Data processing is from 1954.
By way of definitions:
a collection of facts, observations, or other information related to a particular question or problem; as, the historical data show that the budget deficit is only a small factor in determining interest rates.
Which raises the question of whether data is the collection of facts, or the symbolic or other representation of those facts.
Arising as discovered that there is a philosophy of data and I've encountered its philosopher, Brian Ballsun-Stanton (via Mastodon).

Amathia: Unteachably stupid

There are a few concepts on the harm or danger of stupidity. In "One Crucial Word", Massimo Pigliucci explores the Greek term Amathia:
Amathia. It is often translated as “ignorance,” as in the following two famous quotes from Socrates:
“Wisdom alone, is the good for man, ignorance the only evil” (Euthydemus 281d)
“There is, he said, only one good, that is, knowledge, and only one evil, that is, ignorance” (in Diogenes Laertius, II.31)
But just as in the case of other ancient Greek words (like “eudaimonia,” about which I will write later this week) the common translation hardly does the job, and indeed often leads people to misunderstand the concept and quickly dismiss it as “obviously” false, or even incoherent....
Very much worth reading. Via /Philosophy and Paul Beard.

I've made good on a year-old threat and opened up Miranda's Knitting and Tea House

Enjoy! Welcome to the Tea House: Knitting. Tea. Discussion. Intelligence. Sunshine. "We Do Things Different"tm .
This is a sibling subreddit, with more open submissions, though still in a controlled manner. More at the notice.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on stupidity vs. evil

From The Other Place: Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice:
Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice. One may protest against evil; it can be exposed and, if need be, prevented by use of force. Evil always carries within itself the germ of its own subversion in that it leaves behind in human beings at least a sense of unease. Against stupidity we are defenseless. Neither protests nor the use of force accomplish anything here; reasons fall on deaf ears; facts that contradict one’s prejudgment simply need not be believed- in such moments the stupid person even becomes critical – and when facts are irrefutable they are just pushed aside as inconsequential, as incidental. In all this the stupid person, in contrast to the malicious one, is utterly self-satisfied and, being easily irritated, becomes dangerous by going on the attack. For that reason, greater caution is called for than with a malicious one. Never again will we try to persuade the stupid person with reasons, for it is senseless and dangerous....
Read through to the source for the full quote.
I've dug a bit deeper into the backstory. Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a contemporary and friend of Reinhold Neibur, of "Serenity Prayer" fame. He served in the Abwehr, the Nazi intelligence service, during WWII, headed by Wilhelm Canaris. Bonhoeffer and Caneris were executed by the Nazi regime on 9 April, 1945, only three weeks before the fall of Berlin and Hitler's own death. And it turns out that the Abwehr, centre of relatively unfiltered information during the regime, was an active centre of resistance to it, from within.
Bonhoeffer was one of eight children. A brother, and the husbands of two of his sisters, were also executed by the Nazi regime. Bonhoeffer's twin sister Sabine survived until 1999.
Strongly related to the previous item on amathia, and observations from Hanah Arendt.

The Edge Question, 2017

"What Scientific Term or Concept Ought to be More Widely Known?" I find The Edge to be a bit hit-or-miss, and there are some misses here. But there's a heck of a lot of hits on topics that have been floating through my brain-space, and a few names I've been following as well. David Christian ("Big History"), confirmation bias, motivated reasoning, networks, information pathology, ... Daily Nous has a promising list as well. I've got the essays lined up to ... hopefully, read. And this note as a reminder to do that.

John Stuart Mill: A Few Words on Non-Intervention

By way of Wikipedia:
There seems to be no little need that the whole doctrine of non-interference with foreign nations should be reconsidered, if it can be said to have as yet been considered as a really moral question at all... To go to war for an idea, if the war is aggressive, not defensive, is as criminal as to go to war for territory or revenue; for it is as little justifiable to force our ideas on other people, as to compel them to submit to our will in any other respect. But there assuredly are cases in which it is allowable to go to war, without having been ourselves attacked, or threatened with attack; and it is very important that nations should make up their minds in time, as to what these cases are... To suppose that the same international customs, and the same rules of international morality, can obtain between one civilized nation and another, and between civilized nations and barbarians, is a grave error...

Oil is other people's money

I was thinking through the history of the Indiana natural gas boom -- oh, yeah, what Indiana gas boom, you ask? This Indiana gas boom, lasting from about 1884 to 1903. Basically, people realised you could stick a pipe in the ground and burn what came out. Which people did. As free-standing, natural-wonder flambeaux -- flaming torches, visible for miles around. After all, such a God-given abundance would surely last forever, right?
The field burned out, literally, in two decades.
But why waste that resource? I'm thinking of a typical Analyst's Matrix, describing spending your own, vs. other people's money. Let's do that in a table:
Your money Someone else's money
Your use High quality / Low cost High quality / Cost irrelevant
Somebody else's use Quality irrelevant / Low cost Quality irrelevant / Cost irrelevant
When it comes to natural gas, or oil, or coal, the majority of the cost, that is, its initial formation is not borne by you. Only the extraction cost is. That un-borne fraction is effectively other people's money. You care about the quality of the use (its use value), but not the full formation cost.
Oil, coal, and gas, are other people's money.
The legacy of the Indiana boom lives on in a few ways. Ball Glass Company originally formed in the state to take advantage of cheap gas for glass blowing, as did numerous other manufacturing concerns. They eventually shifted to coal. And you'll find the word flambeau turning up in place-names and the odd company name to. Relics to other people's money.

Limitations on Free Speech -- revisiting "shouting 'No Fire!' in a theatre that is in fact on fire"

The dynamics since the American Fascists riots in Charlottesville, VA, and the ACLU reconsidering its position on free speech reminds me that I had started, quite uncomfortably, revisiting my own views on this about three years ago. "Shouting "No Fire" in a Warming World as a Clear and Present Danger" was my thinking at the time.
Further developments -- Charlie Hebdo attacks, "punching vs. punching down", questions over revisionist history, the amazingly good two-part YouTube set by Contrapoints: "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 1)" (video: 16:53) and "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 2)" (video: 17:46) (I'm surprised I hadn't already mentioned it), various research (Jill Gordon, "John Stuart Mill and 'The Marketplace of Ideas'" and Jill Lepore (Kansas City Public Library lecture) both address parts of this. Karl Popper's "Paradox of Tolerance". Many, many discussions, mostly on G+.
The history of free expression / free speech itself is interesting and surprising, particularly the role between Protestant and Catholic factions -- the latter being seen much the same way as Fascists are today, as constitutionally opposed to tolerance, and therefore not subject to the benefits of free speech themselves.

Jeff Schmidt on salaried professionals and the soul-battering system that shapes their lives

Disciplined Minds by physicist Jeff Schmidt has been in my files for a while. Per Unwelcomed Guests Wiki:
This book explains the social agenda of the process of professional training. Disciplined Minds shows how it is used to promote orthodoxy by detecting and weeding out dissident candidates and by exerting pressure on the rest to obey their instructors and abandon personal agendas such as social reform -- so that they, in turn, can perpetuate the system by squeezing the life out of the next generation.
This ... is strikingly similar to the critique of John Stuart Mill of England's educational systems in the 1860s. Hans Jensen addresses this in "John Stuart Mill's Theories of Wealth and Income Distribution" (available via Sci-Hub).
Several prior Reddit mentions.

So no, Sonos! Palindromic boycott of privacy-skewering IoT ToS change

Wireless, cloud-connected speaker manufacturer Sonos have retroactively changed terms of service and required existing product owners monitoring subjects accept the new terms or the devices will cease to function.
And this, boys and girls, is why you don't buy Sonos products, ever.
(Or any Internet of Things that Spy On You devices.)
Palindrome courtesey Sakari Maaranen.

Alexander Hamilton Church and cost accounting: Capital-Labour analysis

Alexander Hamilton Church (28 May 1866 – 11 February 1936) was an English efficiency engineer, accountant and writer on accountancy and management, known for his seminal work of management and cost accounting. In particular, it was his work which expanded the concept of factors of production from just labour to include capital and other inputs.
Among his works, Production factors in cost accounting and works management (1910), from whose introduction:
From the earliest days of manufacturing there has grown up a custom of considering labor as the main and only direct item in production, and of expressing all other expenditure in more or less vague percentages of wage cost. The fact is, however, that labor, while always important, tends to become less important relatively to other items as the progress of organized manufacture develops and the use of specialized and expensive mechanical equipment increases. Very few concerns have come to grief by ignoring labor costs, but many have passed into the hands of receivers by ignoring the relative imiportance of the other factors of production.

On social media and online tools as "optional": Facebook required for AirBnB

Via The Guardian, "I didn’t have enough Facebook friends to prove to Airbnb I was real":
At the other end of the Airbnb helpline in Colorado, “Casey” sounded incredulous. “You have how many Facebook friends?” she drawled. “Er … about 50,” I replied. Long pause. “Well, you don’t have enough for us to verify you. You’d need at least 100.”
“But”, I squeaked, “I post every now and again … I’m on Facebook most days to check on my friends and relations.” This, however, was not enough to convince Airbnb I existed. And, as I didn’t exist, I could not book a room.
Keep this in mind next time someone declares "nobody forces you to use Facebook". Despite the many other refutations of this trope, we can now respond unequivocally: "AirBnB do".

Milestones: the 900 club

Just to memorialise this, and to bury the item as I close out this thread: the Dreddit has crossed the 900 subscriber threshold for the first time. Thanks to all, again, I will strive to be worth your time. It's interesting how much I prefer not to note such things, and yet do in fact note them. The days of teetering just on the edge in particular.

Previously:

One last thing ...

Do you like what you're reading here? Would you like to see a broader discussion? Do you think there are ideas which should be shared more broadly?
The Lair isn't a numbers game, my real goal is quality -- reaching, and hopefully interacting with, an intelligent online community. Something which I've found, in several decades of online interactions, difficult to achieve.
But there's something which works surprisingly well: word of mouth. Shares, by others, to appropriate venues, have generated the best interactions. I do some of that, but I could use your help as well.
So: if you see something that strikes you as particularly cogent (or, perhaps, insipid), please share it. To another subreddit. To Twitter or Facebook or G+. To the small-but-high-quality Metafilter. To your blogging circle, or a mailing list. If you work in technology, or policy, or economics, there as well.
Thanks, Morbius.
submitted by dredmorbius to dredmorbius [link] [comments]

Blockchain - mehr als nur Bitcoin // Basiswissen Was ist eine Blockchain? Dieses Video erklärt dir auf High ... What is Bitcoin? Bitcoin Explained Simply for Dummies ... How to install and run a Blockparser for the Bitcoin ... How does a blockchain work - Simply Explained - YouTube

bitcoin blockchain parser. Contribute to comxtohr/bitcoin-blockchain-parser development by creating an account on GitHub. #bitcoin - General Bitcoin-related; #bitcoin-mining - Mining discussion; Blockchain explorers. Blockchain.info - Blockchain explorer/Webwallet. Blockr.io [dead link 2020-03-28 ⓘ] - Blockchain explorer. blockparser - Fast, quick and dirty bitcoin blockchain parser. Tradeblock - Blockchain explorer with graphical real-time tools. Blockcypher ... I want to update the status of the Bitcoin parser projects, one month ago I have released the new Bitcoin parser caller SpyCBlock, it resides to github at this link. SpyCBlock is a simple parser multicore written with C++11, it parsing the file blk****.dat and produce different serialization, like: Serialization JSON Bitcoin blockchain. Blockchain - Bitcoin. Warum interessieren sich so viele dafür? Initial Coin Offering - Internet of Things. Es ist wie mit dem Internet: Was damit möglich sei, konnte man zu Beginn nicht absehen. Die Blockchain-Technologie könnte Banken überflüssig machen. Doch das wollen die sich nicht gefallen lassen. Nicht nur, weil Wagniskapitalgeber dort derzeit viel investieren, mittlerweile… The first parser combs the BTC blockchain for activity related to 64,529 addresses stemming from 2009 through 2017. The 2010 blocks spent in total on Sunday held 1,050 BTC or $11.9 million at ...

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Blockchain - mehr als nur Bitcoin // Basiswissen

Blockchain technology is the structure behind Bitcoin. A blockchain is a public ledger of records that is arranged in data batches called blocks. Each block is cryptographically validated and ... Was ist eine Blockchain - eine sehr detailierte Erklärung - Einfache Beschreibung einer Blockchain...#bitfantastic #bitcoin #blockchain #ethereum #ripple #bc... Qu'est-ce que le bitcoin, pourquoi faut-il s'y intéresser ? 🤔 L'ACTUALITÉ, TOUS LES JOURS SUR INSTAGRAM : http://instagram.com/hugodecrypte/ L'ACTUALITÉ TOUS... In this short video, the Bitcoin timestamp server / global ledger is discussed. As usual, however, we present ourselves with an ending challenge which is to be covered in the, you guessed it, next ... Bitcoin and cryptocurrency mining explained with the Byzantine Generals Problem. We use it to explain the essence of cryptocurrency mining. https://www.udemy...

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